An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

USS Spruance Returns to Homeport

by Courtesy Story
11 August 2022
USS Spruance Returns to Homeport
220811-N-XL376-1030 SAN DIEGO (Aug. 11, 2022) – The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) returns to homeport Naval Base San Diego. Spruance, a part of Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, returned to Naval Base San Diego after a deployment to U.S. 3rd and 7th Fleets in support of maritime security operations to ensure a free and open Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Maria G. Llanos)
USS Spruance Returns to Homeport
USS Spruance Returns to Homeport
220811-N-XL376-1030 SAN DIEGO (Aug. 11, 2022) – The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) returns to homeport Naval Base San Diego. Spruance, a part of Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, returned to Naval Base San Diego after a deployment to U.S. 3rd and 7th Fleets in support of maritime security operations to ensure a free and open Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Maria G. Llanos)
Photo By: Petty Officer 2nd Class Maria Llanos
VIRIN: 221206-N-N0831-0001
The Arleigh-Burke class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111), returned to Naval Base San Diego, Aug. 11, following a seven-month deployment with Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3 to U.S. 3rd and 7th Fleets.  

Spruance served as the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln’s (CVN 72) primary destroyer escort, spent considerable time activated as the alternate air-missile defense commander, and served as the primary search and attack unit to detect and track foreign submarines. 

The ship’s embarked helicopter detachment was vital during anti-submarine warfare operations, employing ship sensors in concert with those aboard the MH-60R helicopters from Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71’s Combat Element (CEL) 3. Flying more anti-submarine warfare hours than all the other aircraft in Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3 combined while maintaining the highest level of mission capable aircraft, CEL-3 executed more than 1,000 flight hours, 600 of which were at night, and more than 30 hours of anti-submarine missions against foreign navies.  

“Beginning with Cmdr. Micah Sybor, who commanded this ship for the first three months of deployment, and continuing alongside me, Spruance’s ‘Quiet Warriors,’ the name of Adm. Spruance’s biography, repeatedly delivered an awe-inspiring performance over the past seven months,” said Cmdr. Douglas Robb, Spruance commanding officer. “We are lucky to have men and women of this caliber serving our nation. This team steamed into some of the most contested waterways on the planet, but did so with the best training, most reliable equipment and fiercest fighting spirit. We are proud to have sailed in the same waters as Adm. Spruance years ago, and we are honored to be stewards of his legacy.”

Spruance participated in Valiant Shield, operating alongside allies and partners in the Pacific to conduct layered defense and simulated sequenced integrated fires in support of maritime strikes in the region. Additionally, Spruance conducted exercises in the Sea of Japan to enhance maritime interoperability in the Western Pacific region.

Spruance made several port calls including Guam, Manila, Sasebo and Yokosuka. These stops offered Sailors an opportunity to expand their cultural knowledge and appreciation while building relationships with allies and partners. 

During Rim of the Pacific 2022, Spruance was one of 38 ships from 26 participating nations operating in and around the Hawaiian Islands from June 29 to Aug. 4. Spruance conducted underway replenishments with Royal New Zealand Navy auxiliary oiler replenishment ship HMNZS Aotearoa (A 11) and honed anti-submarine warfare tactics, techniques and procedures with the Republic of Korea Navy submarine Dol Seok, Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock HMAS Canberra (L02) and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force helicopter destroyer JS Izumo (DDH 183). 

While deployed, Spruance executed 33 total underway replenishments and two vertical replenishments, taking on 550 pallets of stores and more than five million gallons of fuel.

An integral part of U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. 3rd Fleet leads naval forces in the Indo-Pacific and provides the realistic, relevant training necessary to flawlessly execute our Navy’s role across the full spectrum of military operations—from combat operations to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. U.S. 3rd Fleet works together with our allies and partners to advance freedom of navigation, the rule of law, and other principles that underpin security for the Indo-Pacific region.

For more information and news from USS Spruance (DDG 111), visit: www.dvidshub.net/unit/USSSP 

-30-

 
Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, 2841 Rendova Rd. San Diego, CA 92155-5490
 
This is an official U.S. Navy website
Email: Public Affairs Officer | Webmaster
Commander, Naval Surface Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet, 2841 Rendova Rd. San Diego, CA 92155-5490

This is an official
U.S. Navy website

U.S. Pacific Fleet
2841 Rendova Rd
San Diego, CA
92155-5490

Email:
Public Affairs Officer
Webmaster

 
Guidance-Card-Icon Dept-Exclusive-Card-Icon